Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Pick a Number - Take #2

On Valentine's Day, KCBS out of San Francisco, aired a story about homeowners with low appraisals, and how they are "fighting back". It's not a new story, nor is it a new argument. Appraiser Active has posted on the topic several times since the HVCC took hold back in 2009. HERE, HERE, and HERE. Folks in the brokerage community have documented plenty of sad tales and a number of stories have been written in newspapers and magazines.




Some of the claims appear to have merit; others are outrageous. The video at the link above  is included because we take issue with a couple of statements made by the "experts".


“An appraisal is just an opinion,” said Tara-Nicholle Nelson, consumer educator at Trulia.com.
Sorry, Ms. Nelson, but I must disagree. An appraisal may be stated as "an opinion" but the opinion is stated in the appraisal report after research and analysis of relevant evidence, application of reason and logic, and development of the necessary approaches to value. An appraisal must be developed and reported in accordance with applicable standards, such as the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP), and standards and guidelines required by client groups, government agencies, and individual clients.
Ms. Nelson also claims that “Appraisers are under regulation and under pressure to be much more conservative because they took so much pressure for inflating values at the top of the market,”
Appraiser Active has heard plenty of claims from appraisers about pressure from clients and some AMCs to be conservative, but must have missed the regulation that requires "conservative" opinions of value.

A real estate broker in the video makes the claim that 1 out of 7 deals is killed because of the appraisal. That may be her experience, but she goes on to whine about the buyer's reaction "when an appraisal doesn't come in at value".
Here's a clue for you, my dear: The negotiated sales price is not necessarily the value of the property. It may be an indication, and should certainly be considered in the development of the appraisal, but it's only one small bit of the mountain of data that will be collected, verified and analysed.


Take a look at their story, HERE, and make sure to read the comments.

Just had to get that off my chest.

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